Discuss what have been the traditional expectations for men and women in dat

 
Discuss what have been the traditional expectations for men and women in dating relationships and sexual behavior according to the Week’s Resources and your own research.
Then, discuss how these roles may be affected by the current popularity of online dating sites and images of sexuality portrayed in current literature and other media forms.
Explain how these changing roles may impact individuals and society.
Discuss your thoughts on whether these changing roles will lead to an increase or decrease in gender differences in intimate relationships, and why or why not.

Chapter 6: Somatoform and Dissociative Disorders Hypnotic States and Dissociativ

Chapter 6:
Somatoform and Dissociative Disorders
Hypnotic States and Dissociative Disorders
Persons suffering from dissociative disorders are often highly suggestible and the psychological phenomena resembles what looks very much like a hypnotic state. The term hypnosis is familiar to many, and is often associated with psychotherapy. Yet, the nature of hypnosis is not well understood, including its relation to dissociative disorders. Students will typically find discussion of hypnosis interesting. It remains a highly controversial intervention technique, particularly in the context of dissociative disorders. You can discuss hypnotic states, procedures used to induce them, and their efficacy and effectiveness. This is also an opportunity to relate hypnotic procedures with false memory syndrome. 

Chapter 7: Mood Disorders and Suicide Psychologists as Gatekeepers for Physician

Chapter 7:
Mood Disorders and Suicide
Psychologists as Gatekeepers for Physician-Assisted Suicide?
Suicide in the deliberate taking of one’s life, and most of us tend to think of suicide as the least functional outcome of a human life. Mental health professionals go to great lengths to prevent suicide and to alleviate the suffering that contributes to it. Physician-assisted suicide, by contrast, is a case where medical professionals appear to be facilitating suicide in terminally ill individuals, not acting to preventing it. Though psychologists have not assumed an active role in assisting suicide directly, there is great debate about the role(s) psychologists ought to take in such cases. It could be argued that psychologists, by virtue of their unique training and assessment skills, are best positioned to serve as gatekeepers for physician-assisted suicide. Given trends for prescription authority for psychologists, one may even wonder whether psychologists may someday function as some physicians do now in assisting terminally ill patients to take their own lives. This topic spans a range of ethical, moral, and legal issues that lend themselves to a debate format, or in-class discussion about suicide and the role of psychologists in the prevention and alleviation of suffering.

Arnold Polite, age 14, is brought into therapy by his parents to Frank Facilit,

Arnold Polite, age 14, is brought into therapy by his parents to Frank Facilit, Psy.D., out of concern that he is becoming increasingly depressed and socially withdrawn. During the first session, Dr. Facilit goes over the informed consent (therapeutic contract) with Arnold and his parents and covers issues of confidentiality, fee and missed appointments. He explains to Arnold that because he is a minor, his parents have the right to know about his therapy process and that he can help Arnold to discuss issues that he finds hard to communicate with his parents, as needed. And he also encourages his parents to respect Arnold’s privacy as he is 14-years-old. After negotiating the boundaries of privacy, the parents trust Arnold to make his sessions as he can ride his bike to Dr. Facilit’s office. Dr. Facilit finds Arnold is learning to develop a sense of adolescent autonomy and at times struggles with it. Over several months, Dr. Facilit sees good progress in his work with Arnold. Then, one day, he fails to show up for a scheduled therapy session. Dr. Facilit gives a telephone call to Mr. and Mrs. Polite, who pay for the sessions, to check on Arnold’s absence. Next day Arnold calls Dr. Facilit and expresses concern that the Dr. should not have called his parents. He states that he is unsure if he can continue in therapy with the Dr. or not. If you were Dr. Facilit, what would you do now?
What is the Ethical Dilemma & how would you respond as a therapist?

After reading the directions for interviewing a therapist, post your DRAFT revie

After reading the directions for interviewing a therapist, post your DRAFT review questions here for so that I can review them. 
The questions can be connected to your initial ethical codes that you have identified and/or can be wider based on your area of interest and readings.
Submit at-least 3-4 questions that are open-ended. Your interview should have at-least 10 questions. (Avoid close ended questions, unless they are screening questions).
I want all of you to use the following question in your interview. It does not have to be worded in this way, but as long as you ask about a difficult choice/decision that they had to make and their process with solving it:
“I am curious to learn how therapists make ethical choices in their therapeutic practice. I would like to learn about a difficult choice you have had to make, a
decision that involved a situation where you were unsure what to do. How did you go about it?’’

Anxiety Disorders Using Medications to Minimize the Psychological Impact of Trau

Anxiety Disorders
Using Medications to Minimize the Psychological Impact of Trauma: Is this a Good Thing?
Roger Pitman and colleagues have been investigating the efficacy of several medications as a means to minimize the lasting impact of traumatic events. Such medications, delivered shortly after the trauma, appear to minimize the likelihood of subsequent PTSD symptoms. Nonetheless, some might argue that traumatic events, though undesirable, ought to be processed fully for meaningful recovery. Drugs that interfere with this process are viewed as counter-therapeutic, while implicitly conveying that trauma memories are bad and should be minimized. One could envision similar approaches with other forms of human suffering (guilt, shame, regret), raising obvious moral and ethical concerns. This topic should be integrated into the discussion of PTSD and its treatment.